Business English

After Work Business English

Want to improve your Business English out of office hours at a manageable price? There are people out there who do not have the opportunity to do business English training paid by their company and so some years ago I decided to offer the possibility at my office in Othmarschen.  We start at 6 pm and each session runs for for 90 minutes. The course of 26 sessions is economically priced and English tea is thrown in at every session.  The group also accompanies my business theatre group to the Read more [...]
Christmas is around the corner, meaning mince pies are back in! Every year for the Christmas season the whole of Britain is eating the small fruit filled pastries. They can be made with shortcrust or puff pastry – a thin layer of dough on the bottom and the top encases the filling, which is called mincemeat. Mincemeat is usually made of chopped fruit, nuts, spices, and often people like to add a dash of alcohol such as brandy or rum. I personally prefer homemade mincemeat, because you can add all the spices and alcohol you want and experience and explore until you find the perfect mix. Ingredients are usually mixed with spices such as cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg; these spices symbolize the gifts of the three wise men from the Orient. Mince pies taste best when they are served warm, with a little sprinkling of icing sugar on top. Cream, custard or brandy butter (a Christmas speciality) also go well with them as a dessert after the delicious Christmas meal, or as an accompaniment to Christmas pudding. However, they also taste delicious with a simple cup of tea or coffee… Britain has enjoyed mince pies since medieval times where they called it Chewette pastry, which was either baked or fried and stuffed with liver or pieces of meat mixed with boiled eggs and ginger. For variation people then started to fill them with dried fruit and other sweet things, and in the 16th century they developed into a Christmas speciality. During the 17th century, the meat was increasingly replaced by kidney fat, and since the 19th century the sweet form has largely established itself as a typical mince pie. Of course, Santa cannot miss out on this delicious tradition, so one or two mince pies are traditionally placed in front of the fireplace on Christmas Eve, since mince pies are considered Santa’s favourite d

The Sweet British Christmas Tradition

Christmas is around the corner, meaning mince pies are back in! Every year for the Christmas season the whole of Britain is eating the small fruit filled pastries. They can be made with shortcrust or puff pastry – a thin layer of dough on the bottom and the top encases the filling, which is called mincemeat.  Mincemeat is usually made of chopped fruit, nuts, spices, and often people like to add a dash of alcohol such as brandy or rum. I personally prefer homemade mincemeat, because you can Read more [...]
job application, business English

Are you fit for a Job Application in an International Company?

It’s no secret now that if you apply for a job in an international company here in Germany, you may need to prepare your CV in English.  You should note that English CVs (Curriculum Vitae in UK English / Resume in US English) do not carry a photograph – this has never been the case – it’s not what you look like that is important, it’s whether you can do the job! The format of an English CV is also different to German.  If you apply for a job in an English speaking country, then, unless Read more [...]
Remembrance Day 2019

Remembrance Day and the Origin of the Poppy as a Commemorative Symbol

It is small and red. It is worn on 11 November every year across Britain and other English-speaking countries, and has been a tradition since the end of the First World War. It’s called a poppy, but what is the actual meaning behind this flower? Since 1920, this day has been a national day of remembrance in the British Empire. On Remembrance Day, Armistice Day or Poppy Day (as the day is variously called), which is comparable to the German Memorial Day, the small, red poppy is worn to remember Read more [...]
Bonfire Night

Remember, Remember the Fifth of November: A Brief History of Guy Fawkes Night in the UK

“Remember, remember the fifth of November, the gunpowder treason and plot. I know of no reason why the Gunpowder treason should ever be forgot!” You may have heard of the English nursery rhyme that starts with the classic line ‘Remember, remember the fifth of November.’ The dramatic story behind this rhyme continues to inspire British citizens to celebrate the 5th November, or Guy Fawkes Night, every year with fireworks and bonfires. So who was Guy Fawkes and what is the real story behind Read more [...]